BOOK & REVIEWS

 

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Speaking for Ourselves: Voices of Biblical Women

Morehouse Publishing, 1998

There are many powerful women in the Bible, but their descriptions are almost always tantalizingly brief. If they had the chance to tell their own stories in their own voices, what would they have said? Basing her interpretation of these women on extensive research, Katerina Whitley puts herself in their shoes, giving today’s listeners a fuller understanding of each of their stories.

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Material Media
Amazon
... compelling... so powerful that as I read, I could almost feel the presence of [the characters]

Mary Koch, reviewing for Inland Episcopalian: Episcopal Diocese of Spokane

.. dramatic... the book celebrates their heartaches and joys in a way that is intimate and moving

Cathy Boyd, Editor of Communique reviewing for Episcopal Life


... engaging... ... useful book for Bible sharing or women's groups.

Sister Dianne Bergant, C.S.A., Catholic Theological Union Chicago, IL, reviewing for The Bible Today

My admiration soared... .there are strong feminine stories given voice in Ms. Whitley's little treasure of a book.

The Rev. Elizabeth Moulton reviewing for Diocesan Life


Seeing for Ourselves: Biblical Women Who Met Jesus

Morehouse Publishing, 2001

In Seeing for Ourselves: Biblical Women Who Met Jesus, Whitley gives powerful voice to the New Testament women who met Jesus both before and after the Resurrection. The women who speak in this collection include some we meet only in passing in the Bible.
As Speaking for Ourselves, the book includes references to the biblical passages along with study questions, making this an excellent book for group study.

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Material Media
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There are many powerful women in the Bible, but their descriptions are almost always tantalizingly brief. If they had the chance to tell their own stories in their own voices, what would they have said? Basing her interpretation of these women on extensive research, Katerina Whitley puts herself in their shoes, giving today's listeners a fuller understanding of each of their stories. Each woman speaks for herself in these monologues, in a way that brings the biblical issues and questions into contemporary focus. An introduction to each woman and study questions at the end of each piece make this an ideal book for individuals and groups.

Church Publishing, Inc.


A collection of dramatic monologues that tell the stories of many of the women whom we know only as mothers, daughters or wives. Part biblical interpretation and part icon, the book celebrates their heartaches and joys in a way that is intimate and moving.

Episcopal Life


Walking the Way of Sorrows: Stations of the Cross

Morehouse Publishing, 2003

Each year on Good Friday, Christian congregations all over the world walk the Stations of the Cross, a commemoration of Jesus’ walk to Calvary. In Walking the Way of Sorrows, artist Noyes Capehart and writer/journalist Katerina Whitley provide a fresh resource for congregations and individuals who want to explore the meaning of these Stations more deeply. Capehart’s stark and powerful blockcuts of the fourteen Stations are accompanied by monologues from the point of view of someone at each station. These monologues, along with biblical references and a brief liturgy, are excellent for individual devotion, but can also be used by groups who walk the Stations together.

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Material Media
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Probably the most moving of Whitley's books, and that is saying a lot. Her account of the experienced reality of the people who were there that day on Calvary can bring the most cerebral theologian to tears.

Judy Wilson


Many Christians walk the Stations of the Cross as a way of expressing their devotion and participation in the suffering and death of Jesus Christ. In this excellent resource, church journalist Katerina Katsarka Whitley has written monologues tied to each one of the fourteen stations on the Way of Sorrows. Whitley’s goal here is to draw out our empathy and compassion for all those involved in the terrifying events of Jesus’ last day. She concludes: "May God have mercy on us all as we enter into these stories allowing them to cause us to feel pain, hope, love, and gratitude. Assume the persona of each one of them on the way of sorrows as you walk with them. . .” The visually powerful woodcuts of the fourteen Stations of the Cross by artist Noyes Capehart add immeasurably to the impact of these devotional exercises.

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat, Spirituality and Health


Light to the Darkness Lessons and Carols, Public and Private

Morehouse Publishing, 2008

Light to the Darkness is a fresh interpretation of the well-loved Advent tradition of Lessons and Carols. Replacing the usual scriptural readings from the Old and New Testaments are first-person dramatic monologues based on these and other passages of scripture.
Special emphasis is given to the role of the prophets, pointing the way to the Messiah and offering guidance to the Hebrew people, while providing very contemporary guidance for the 21st-century.
With a reading for each day of Advent, churches can choose pieces for their services of Lessons and Carols, while individuals can use the book for private devotions. Suggested music for these services is also included, encompassing a broad range of selections to accommodate parishes’ needs and abilities.

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The voices of our faith ancestors, written by Katerina Whitley as dramatic monologues, stir in my heart God’s repeated promise to be “a light to the darkness.” Eve, in conversation with a great, great, great grandchild who asks her, “Do you remember the garden?” Miriam, letting go of her jealous heart as she watches Moses rise in prominence among the people; Sarah on her death bed, a voice in the wilderness, reminding the women that she, wife of Abraham, was one through whom God’s promise was fulfilled. These are the stories within the stories that evoke my wonder as I consider the human encounter with God. In these accounts I see heroes and heroines in scripture with different eyes. The reflections for each monologue, drawing on the excellence of biblical scholarship, provoke a deeper appreciation and understanding of the scriptural accounts. Whether as an individual seeking spiritual wisdom, or a parish desiring to enrich the Advent experience with this book of Lessons and Carols, Light to the Darkness is achingly beautiful.

Marion Danforth, Theologian/Professor of Theology, Adjunct Professor, Loyola Institute for Ministry, Ed.D.


Katerina Katsarka Whitley is delightfully intelligent. Either silently at home, or read aloud to an audience, Light to the Darkness feels as if she had actually lived with the people of the Bible.

Barry Chafin


Around a Greek Table: Recipes and Stories Arranged According to the Liturgical Seasons of the Easter Church

Lyons Press, 2012

Around a Greek Table explores the intricacies of Greek cooking and makes these once mysterious recipes both understandable and possible, and organizes 100 unique recipes around the Eastern Church’s yearly seasons. The book also delves deep into tales of Greek life with intimate and historical essays exploring the ancient stories that are told around Greek tables in the honored tradition of combining myths with food.
This book is my love letter to my children and grandchildren and to all the friends who have eaten at my table. It is also an offering to those who love other cultures and want to know more about my particular Greek culture, one filled with storytelling and joie de vivre, kefi in my language.

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Around A Greek Table is extraordinary in the sense that Whitley describes Greek cooking with the same unbridled passion she has demonstrated in her books on faith, her writing in Episcopal publications over past decades, and her popular dramatic readings that are based on her research into the powerful voices of biblical women.
(Read the full review here)

Jerry Hames, Episcopal Journal

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Katerina’s love for cooking demonstrates her passion for life. Her recipes exemplify the warmth, tradition, and generosity of spirit found in Greek culture. This is truly a mouth-watering journey!

Missy Watson, The Best Cellar Restaurant

Around a Greek Table explores the intricacies of Greek cooking and makes these once-mysterious recipes both understandable and possible, and organizes 100 unique recipes around the Eastern Church’s yearly seasons. The book also delves deep into tales of Greek life with intimate and historical essays exploring the ancient stories that are told around Greek tables in the honored tradition of combining myths with food.

Gregory Pappas, The Pappas Post


Waiting for the Wonder: Voices of Advent

(3 CD set) Unabridged Audio Book

These twenty-seven dynamic monologues authored and performed by Katerina Katsarka Whitley prepare one for the excitement of the child on Christmas Eve. From the ancient prophets to the three kings, from the angel Gabriel to the stalwart Joseph, Katerina Katsarka Whitley imagines their astonishment and joy at the events unfolding around them.

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Material Media
Amazon
Katerina Whitley is one of those rare people who have the imagination to bridge the centuries. This is not play-acting; she becomes an icon into the biblical text. To hear her tell these stories is not only to gain a greater understanding of the biblical characters, but to be drawn to them, by the heart’s illumination...

Rev. Nancy J. Allison


Whitley’s ability to find her way into the minds and hearts of biblical figures has taken a new turn. In the worlds of those who awaited the coming of the coming of—Something—which they sometimes can name, and sometimes can only yearn for, Whitley turns her spotlight this way and that, throwing the glow of her imagination on many aspects of the concept of waiting.

Schuyler Kauffman, Carolina Mountain Living


Waiting for the Wonder: Voices of Advent

BOOK, Morehouse Publishing, 2005

These thirty dynamic monologues authored and performed by Katerina Katsarka Whitley prepare one for the excitement of the child on Christmas Eve. From the ancient prophets to the three kings, from the angel Gabriel to the stalwart Joseph, Katerina Katsarka Whitley imagines their astonishment and joy at the events unfolding around them.

Click below to purchase books at Material Media or Amazon.com.

Material Media
Amazon
Beautiful prose, reading like poetry, which tells of the advent of the promise of peace to the world and the birth of a Savior. Each essay is in the voice of the biblical figures which surround the wondrous birth. . . This book is a welcome celebration of goodness, a message of hope and anticipation that each of us longs for, especially at Christmas.

Mary Popham, author Back Home in Landing Run


Whitley’s ability to find her way into the minds and hearts of biblical figures has taken a new turn. In the worlds of those who awaited the coming of the coming of—Something—which they sometimes can name, and sometimes can only yearn for, Whitley turns her spotlight this way and that, throwing the glow of her imagination on many aspects of the concept of waiting.

Schuyler Kauffman, Carolina Mountain Living


She (Katerina) does an excellent job of presenting the wonder of Advent and imparting her own strong belief in the doctrine of the Incarnation. She recalls as a child wondering why the world didn’t notice the angels. As she worked on this book she wrote, “I became convinced that only the ears of faith heard the angels’ song and only the eyes of faith saw the angels. And the one prerequisite for revelation was a heart that longed to God’s goodness on the earth.
Her book presents a creative journey through Advent with a feeling of the wonder of waiting and the wonder of God’s arriving in our world in the person of Jesus Christ."

Rev. Dick Snyder, Episcopal Life


A New Love; A Novel of the First Century

Material Media, 2016
Pre-order now. Release date: May 16, 2016

What was it like meeting St. Paul in Corinth — seeing him work with his hands and hearing his passionate words that revealed his profound and unbreakable connection to the living Christ? And what was it like to be a girl, highly educated and gifted and in love in mid-first century, in the Greco-Roman world? You will find the answers to these questions hidden among the layers of eros and agape in A New Love.

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Material Media
Katerina Whitley has succeeded in crafting a novel which deftly portrays the earliest years of the Christian faith. The plot, while following scripture, offers a sense of real people who suffer real tragedies, whose lives are made new by the gospel. She captures a moment in history before the Bible was written, before the creeds were crafted. While reading this novel, I found myself engaged, and discovered that my own faith was quickened.

Mary C. Earle, author of The Desert Mothers, Days of Grace, and Beginning Again


Katerina Katsarka Whitley's great skill as a writer is the ability to bring back to life characters most of us see only veiled in distance and history. In putting flesh back on their bones, she is doing what great books have always done--she allows us to see old stories (and our own stories) anew. New Love is a gift shaped by solid scholarship and beautiful storytelling.

Greg Garrett, author of The Prodigaland Entertaining Judgement: The Afterlife in Popular Imagination


Katerina Katsarka Whitley’s novel, A New Love, is not primarily an historical romance but rather a “loves” story. The young-girl-figures-out-who-she-truly-loves plot, set in the Greco-Roman world of the first century, is the loom on which Whitley weaves the more powerful story about how the new idea of God as Love began to change the world. We see a wide range of people – women and men, slaves and rulers, craftsmen, artists, laborers -- coming into contact with converts to the new religion of Christos and being touched, and changed, by the Love that lies at its heart. One of those people is a young Greek woman, Helena, whose world falls apart early in the book, then slowly and painfully takes a new shape as she finds a haven in the home of Phoebe, a Greek Christian, meets Paul the Apostle, and experiences firsthand the selfless love they say comes from Christ. This is an intriguing read for 21st-century Christians who rarely think about the day-to-day lives of early Christians.

Jane W. Blackburn, Director of Libraries - Appalachian Regional Library

“Oh, that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.”